Biolarvicides and malaria control

icipe recently published the results of a study conducted in Tolay, southwestern Ethiopia, to explore the ability of three biolarvicides: neem, chinaberry, and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), to kill the larvae of Anopheles arabiensis, the mosquito vector of malaria, in comparison to conventionally used insecticides.

Applying an icipe-developed biolarvicide to kill larvae of Anopheles mosquitoes in a rice field.
Applying an icipe-developed biolarvicide to kill larvae of Anopheles mosquitoes in a rice field.

The research, funded by Biovision Foundation for Ecological Development, showed the biolarvicides to be effective against the larvae and pupae of An. arabiensis. In contrast, a high level of mosquito resistance to pyrethroid insecticides and DDT was confirmed. Therefore, the researchers conclude that using an integrated vector management (IVM) approach that includes the application of neem, chinaberry, and Bti can potentially help to manage mosquito resistance to synthetic insecticides and reduce overall reliance on such compounds to control malaria. Publication link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2221169116304191