International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology’s (icipe) climate-smart push-pull helping to stabilise cereal–livestock mixed production systems in East Africa

International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology’s (icipe) climate-smart push-pull helping to stabilise cereal–livestock mixed production systems in East Africa A climate-smart version of the icipe push-pull technology is enabling farmers living in some of the East African regions most severely affected by climate change to stabilise their cereal–livestock mixed production systems. Read more...

Mosquito Terminators: A review published by The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe) and University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Mosquito Terminators: A review published by The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe) and University of Canterbury, New Zealand An extensive review undertaken by icipe and the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, on the only two spider species known to specifically target mosquitoes, Evarcha culicivora and Paracyrba wanlessi has been published in the current issue of the Journal of Arachnology. Read more...

Introducing Muhaka icipe: A new, bizzare wasp discovered in Kenya

Introducing Muhaka icipe: A new, bizzare wasp discovered in Kenya icipe taxonomists in collaboration with colleagues at the Smithsonian Institution, USA, have discovered a new, enigmatic wasp genus and species in Muhaka forest on the south coast of Kenya. Read more...

icipe Annual Report 2014

icipeAnnual Report 2014 icipe has published its Annual Report to present achievements in 2014, which was also Dr Segenet Kelemu’s first year as the Director General of the Centre. Read more...

icipe and collaborators discover 13 new wasp species in Kenya and Burundi

icipe and collaborators discover 13 new wasp species in Kenya and Burundi icipe taxonomists in collaboration with colleagues from the Tropical Entomology Research Institute and the University of Tuscia, both in Italy, have discovered 13 previously unknown wasps species in Kenya and Burundi. Read more...

Eating the desert locust reduces the risk of heart disease

Eating the desert locust reduces the risk of heart disease Eating the meat of the desert locust could be good for your heart, says a study conducted jointly by icipe, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology and United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (USDA/ARS). Read more...

Our Mission

icipe's mission is to help alleviate poverty, ensure food security and improve the overall health status of peoples of the tropics by developing and extending management tools and strategies for harmful and useful arthropods, while preserving the natural resource base through research and capacity building.

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  • 40 Years of Science in Africa

A climate-smart version of the icipe push-pull technology is enabling farmers living in some of the East African regions most severely affected by climate change to stabilise t...

Mosquito Terminators: A review published by The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe) and University of Canterbury, New Zealand An extensive review undert...

icipe taxonomists in collaboration with colleagues at the Smithsonian Institution, USA, have discovered a new, enigmatic wasp genus and species in Muhaka forest on the south c...

icipe has published its Annual Report to present achievements in 2014, which was also Dr Segenet Kelemu’s first year as the Director General of the Centre. ...

icipe and collaborators discover 13 new wasp species in Kenya and Burundi icipe taxonomists in collaboration with colleagues from the Tropical Entomology Research Institute and...

Over two-thirds of the population in the developing world are small-scale farmers, many of whom are dependent on livestock for their everyday survival. Improvement of livestock...

Plant health research is icipe's oldest and also its largest research agenda. It has the goal of contributing to improved sustainable food security and environmental health th...

Human activities such as agricultural production and establishment of settlements have reduced the natural environment and its biodiversity. Ninety percent of the land surface has ...

The major objective of icipe’s Capacity Building and Institutional Development Programme is to build human resource capacity in insect science and related areas of the bioscience...

Human health research focuses on anopheline mosquitoes, which transmit the malaria parasites. Malaria is the tropics' most serious infectious disease, affecting more than 500 milli...

Agyeiwaa G., Fening K.O., Ofori D.O., Nguku E. and Raina S.K. (2014) Performance of five bivoltine Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) strains on three mulberry varieties in...

Abd-Alla A., Bergoin M., Parker A.G., Maniania N.K., Vlak J.M., Bourtzis K., Boucias D.G. and Aksoy S. (2013) Improving sterile insect technique (SIT) for tsetse flies throu...

icipe Biennial Highlights Biennial Highlights 2011 - 2012 Biennial Highlights 2010 - 2011 Biennial Report Highlights 2008–2009   icipe Scientific Reports Scienti...

Addis T., Vollrath F., Raina S.K., Kabaru J.M. and Onyari J. (2012) Study on microstructures of African wild silk cocoon shells and fibers. International Journal of Biological Ma...

Addis T., Raina S.K., Vollrath F., Kabaru J.M., Onyari J. and Nguku E.K. (2011) Study on weight loss and moisture regain of silk cocoon shells and degummed fibers from African wi...

Showcasing Photos of icipe's Journey icipe's Official Opening 20th Anniversary General Historical Photo Gallery ...

His Excellency Daniel Toroitich arap Moi graced the occasion. {gallery}icipe/about_us/historical/icipe_official_opening/{/gallery}...

icipe's 20th Anniversary Celebration photo gallery. {gallery}icipe/about_us/historical/20th_anniversary/{/gallery}...

General historical photos about icipe. {gallery}icipe/about_us/historical/general/{/gallery}...

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